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Tuesday, March 8, 2011

The Harper Government's tipping point

The Globe's Lawrence Martin catalogues the many indicators of the Harper Government's abuse of power.

Read it here.

Nothing we haven't been saying, of course. Just a partial list (feel free to add your favourite examples in the comments):

  • Richard Colvin.
  • Linda Keen.
  • Omar Khadr.
  • The G20.
  • In and out.
  • Remy Beauregard.
  • Proroguing.
  • Kairos.
  • The Security Council embarrassment.

It goes on and on and on. What we've got here is not just a failure to communicate, but a government that demonstrates every day its contempt for democratic governance, for an impartial civil service, for the mechanisms of accountability, and for the very infrastructure of civil society.

If by their fruits we shall know them, then it's time to take this tree down.

(Update: speaking of rotten fruit, isn't it time to put Peggy Wente out with the compost?)

3 comments:

  1. You should read Martin's "Harperland". "Harperland" packaged together, plus some stuff I betcha didn't know...quite an eye opener, really.

    And many of Martin's sources are actual bonafide Cons--former MPs, staffers and colleagues from NCC, including Gerry Nicholls and Keith Beardsley.

    Yes, "Harperland" is recommended reading.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I do think that the opposition parties can present the accumulated effects of Harper's lack of integrity only if they demonstrate that these effects affect Harper's inability to manage the economy properly while hurting Canadian families and individuals. The opposition must also demonstrate that if Harper won't let his own cabinet ministers and MPs speak on behalf of Canadians, then Harper doesn't care about listening to Canadians.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "only if they demonstrate that these effects affect Harper's inability to manage the economy properly" -- why? The Libs weren't tossed out of office because they were thought guilty of mismanaging the economy: it was in great shape, with pretty near full employment (for Canada) and running consecutive surpluses. No, it was because of a perceived loss of trust & character flaw (arrogance): sound like anyone else you know?

    ReplyDelete

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